Selected News

Canada’s new far right: A trove of private chat room messages reveals an extremist subculture

An analysis of 150,000 chat room messages paints a picture of a group that is actively recruiting new members, buying weapons and trying to influence political parties

SHANNON CARRANCO AND JON MILTON
SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
PUBLISHED APRIL 27, 2019

THE GLOBE AND MAIL

Canada’s focus on dangers of white supremacy has caused conflict with some international allies, official says

Canada has been butting heads with some of its closest allies over the extent to which rising white supremacy at home and abroad poses a global threat, federal insiders say.

The quiet but at-times-controversial diplomacy has come as Justin Trudeau’s Liberals, gearing up for a federal election campaign this fall, try to portray Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer and his party as soft on white supremacy and so-called alt-right views.

Starving online trolls won’t stop far-right ideas from going mainstream

Facebook recently announced it is banning a number of Canadian far-right figures and groups from its platform. Those expelled from Facebook include the “alt-right” activist Faith Goldy and the hate groups Soldiers of Odin, the Canadian Nationalist Front, and the Aryan Strikeforce.

The decision comes on the heels of the terrorist attacks in Christchurch, New Zealand, where a white supremacist killed 50 worshippers and injured 50 more at two mosques in the city.

The Far Right Doesn't Want To Beat The Left; It Wants To Exterminate It

Every right-wing authoritarian movement has one thing in common: a brutal clampdown on any persons or groups who promote equality.

Hundreds of white nationalists, neo-Nazis, and members of the alt-right march down East Market Street toward Emancipation Park during the Unite the Right rally on August 12th, 2017, in Charlottesville, Virginia.

(Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Facebook bans UK far right groups and leaders

Facebook has imposed a ban on a dozen far-right individuals and organisations that it says "spread hate".

The ban includes the British National Party and Nick Griffin, the English Defence League and the National Front. 

The list also includes Britain First, which was already banned, but this latest action will prohibit support for it on any of the US firm's services.

It said it had taken the action because those involved had proclaimed a "violent or hateful mission".

UCP candidate screening went awry, says political scientist after reviewing 44-page questionnaire

'There shouldn't be as many candidate problems as they have'

A couple of United Conservative Party candidates have dropped out during the election after making racist comments and controversy swirls around some others on the party slate.

But those prospective politicians made it through the party's own extensive questionnaire that all its candidates must fill out, — a document obtained and verified by CBC News.
Some questions are mundane. But other questions are more personal.

Facebook bans do not equate to restrictions on free speech

"There seems to be a fundamental misunderstanding in some circles of what freedom of speech is actually about. Goldy and her friends are not being silenced, but some of their venues are rejecting them. It’s not particularly different from someone being allowed to speak their mind outside of one’s home, but not be invited into the kitchen to hold forth."

Twitter bans white-nationalist group Canadian Nationalist Front

Twitter suspended accounts associated with the white-nationalist group Canadian Nationalist Front on Tuesday, a day after Facebook banned that group as well as others it said promoted “organized hate” from its platform. The move comes as lawmakers in Canada and abroad debate imposing new rules on social-media companies in the wake of deadly shootings at two mosques in New Zealand.

On Tuesday, Twitter declined to comment but confirmed that multiple accounts affiliated with the group were permanently suspended under its Violent Extremist Group policy.

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