A Brief History of Counteracting Hate in BC

KKK – Surrey 1980 

Wolfgang Droege joined the Ku Klux Klan, then led by David Dukein the USA, in December 1976 after attending the "International Patriotic Congress" in New Orleans. Droege was a German-born Canadian white supremacist, neo-Nazi, convicted drug dealer and later the founding leader of the Heritage Front. Droege was second in command to Canadian Grand Wizard James Alexander McQuirterand spreadthe KKK "one law for all" and "equal rights for everyone" slogans. Droege was the main organizer for the KKK in British Columbia. 

The British Columbia Organization to Fight Racism (BCOFR) was founded to oppose the KKK in BC. The Klan had been organizing in downtown Vancouver with leaflets and flyers and the Vancouver Sun had covered the issue with a photo of members in Klan outfits standing and laughing on a main street in downtown Vancouver. The BCOFR called for a legal ban on the Klan and its activities. 

The first meeting of the BCOFR was held in Surrey, attracting over 400 people to “Take a Stand: Ban the Klan Rally.” The call to action was endorsed by the Union of BC Indian Chiefs, the Tribal Council of BC and the Chinese Benevolent Society, among others, and trade unions like the BC Teacher’s Federation, the Vancouver and District Labour Council and the Telecommunications Workers Union. 

A petition was circulated among trade union, student groups and various community groups and 16,000 people signed. 750 people later marched in the largest anti-racism demonstration of the time to the Vancouver offices of the Attorney General of BC to hand-deliver the petition. 

With popular support for anti-racism and the attention of the Attorney General, the Klan was not able to hold the larger rallies it held in central and eastern Canada. However, to carry out further educational work, the BCOFR formed the BCOFR Education and Research Society and incorporated it as a society in 1984. The Society soon began to undertake research and carry out workshops and training sessions and eventually became the Canadian Anti-racism Education and Research Society (CAERS) in 1990.

That year CAERS exposed Bryan Taylor as the head of the KKK in BC. Taylor worked for a major home and business security company and used company resources to mail Klan information to members of the group. (See Taylor below)

British Pantry - Richmond 1989 

“The Business of Racism” was the title of a campaign to draw attention to a retail store in Richmond, BC selling racist material. The store sold, among other items, a pin that depicted visible minorities in stereotypical garments threatening a small white person with the caption, “Who is the minority in Canada?” The BCOFR condemned the sale of the pin arguing that it was racist. Over fifty organizations formed a collation to oppose the sale of racist buttons, including unions, churches and community groups, anti-racist organizations, First Nations and many individuals. 

The store was picketed and flyers against the sale of racist material were distributed over a number of months. The pickets received extensive media attention and community meetings were subsequently organized with NDP MLA Emery Barnes giving support. A meeting on May 14, 1989 at the Native Friendship Center in Vancouver was held and a formal committee was struck to coordinate work. 

Meetings were then held with City of Richmond staff and a set of recommendations was prepared for City Council. These included a condemnation of the sale and distribution of racist material and by-laws to stop the distribution. One result was that the sale of racist material was stopped and the store closed. But the major result was that many people and groups at every level of society became engaged in exposing and stopping RWE. 

 Church of Christ in Israel/Aryan Nations – Chilliwack 1992 

Charles Scott drew national attention when he opened a branch of Church of Christ in Israel in Chilliwack in the early 1990s. Scott was televised providing self-defense training with member of the Canadian Armed Forces Scott at the Jerico base in Vancouver, BC. 

Scott received a mail-bomb while in Chilliwack and reported it to the RCMP. Scott and colleagues, Edgar Foth and Mattt Harrison, moved several times but received more bomb threats and his house was vandalized. 

When Scott moved to Kelowna from Chilliwack, community groups responded with a town hall to discuss hate groups and hate group recruitment, schools hosted a series of workshops on hate groups, and one group organized a yearly Run Against Racism. The town hall attracted approximately 150 and the Run Against Racism became a popular demonstration of residents to a racism free community. 

Extensive media coverage through the Okanagan Valley and led to Scott’s move to a tiny village near Creston in eastern BC, where more town halls were organized with meetings with the help of the Mayor and City Council. 

Scott eventually left Aryan Nations in the late 1990s and with him Aryan Nations largely disbanded.

 Japanese Air LinesRichmond 1992

CAERS helped form a coalition to boycott Japanese Air Lines (JAL) for alleged discriminatory seating and stopover policy in Japan. An employee of Canadian Airlines, the booking agent for JAL, revealed a written policy that ordered JAL attendants to seat Delhi-bound passengers at the back of the plane. It was also alleged that hotel reservations for stopovers in Japan were discriminatory since Delhi-bound passengers were allocated basement accommodation. 

JAL denied that the seating and reservation policy were discriminatory. Following the demonstrations and negative publicity, JAL agreed that there would be no seating and stopover reservations without the consent of passengers.

 Racism, Law Enforcement and the LawVancouver 1992

One of the most successful conferences on racism, law enforcement and the law was held in Vancouver in 1992. The Canadian Anti-racism Education and Research Society with the Congress of Black Women, the BC Chapter of Immigrant and Visible Minority Women, the League organized the conference for Human Rights of B’Nai Brith, the BC Organization to Fight Racism and the Minority Advocacy and Rights Council. 

The conference drew together representatives from the Justice Department, Council of Human Rights, human rights lawyers, author Warren Kinsella, Marc Sandler and Karen Mock of B’Nai Brith and law enforcement officers from Ottawa, Edmonton and Vancouver along with anti-racists from the USA. The province of BC and the federal government funded the conference and proceedings. This was the first of several such conferences held throughout BC to provide education, help coordinate and mobilize groups. 

White Aryan Resistance - Vancouver 1993 

One of the largest demonstrations in in Canada brought over 3,000 people together on a cold winter night to protest Tony McAleer’s plan to host a meeting with Tom Metzger of White Aryan Resistance (WAR). WAR was one of the main neo-Nazi groups in North America with bases in Ottawa and Surrey. McAleer advertised the meeting through the Aryan Resistance Movement (ARM) on his racist telephone line, Canadian Liberty Net (CLN). 

McAleer boasted on television and radio that he would bring Metzger to Vancouver regardless of immigration restrictions issued after Metzger had spoken at a meeting of the Heritage Front in Toronto. To prevent violent confrontations between Odin’s Law, ARM and anti-racists, CAERS mobilized a wide range of community groups and held a news conference at the Coast Plaza to explain the need for non-violent demonstrations showing support for diversity and anti-racism. 

The planning of the rally and the earlier news conference before the demonstration received extensive national and local TV and print media exposure and live coverage of the actual demonstration. The Vancouver anti-racist demonstration brought elected officials, union representatives, anti-racist and community groups, and ordinary people together to voice opposition to hate. 

Anti-racist skinheads also attended the rally to show that racist skinheads were only a small fraction of the skinhead movement. The result of the massive demonstration against RWE was that WAR was not able to hold a meeting of any size or consequence in BC.

McAleer

McAleer was charged with violating the Canadian Human Rights Code for running a telephone hate line. McAleer was defended by the notorious Doug Christie and it was rumoured that legal expenses were paid by a Salmon Arm racist group. McAleer was then found to be in contempt for moving his telephone line to Washington State.  

(Deported from Germany with Metzger’s son/ Droege connection)

McAleer left and his association with the leaders of the racist popular movement in BC a few years later when it was reported that he could not find work because of his association with racists. McAleer himself claims that his renunciation of hate resulted from therapy and fathering a child. Tony later joined a group that was formed to help reform youth who had joined hate groups. McAleer now promotes his non-profit group, but has never revealed the history of his connections with Christie, journalist Doug Christie and other members of the far-right in BC or with Tom Metzger with WAR in California. 

 North Shore News - North Vancouver 1995 

The North Shore News was based in North Vancouver and began to regularly publish articles suggesting that immigrants from Iran were taking over Canada, were responsible for crime and that the Holocaust did not occur in the early 1990s. 

Authorities cited for these claims were Ernst Zundel and a number of European Holocaust deniers, including David Irving. CAERS organized demonstrations to denounce the publisher and newspaper with local community groups. The collation also organized a boycott of the North Shore News. 

Two human rights complaints were subsequently filed under the BC Human Rights Code against the editor and the author responsible, Doug Collins. Collins retaliated with meetings in several public libraries with Doug Christie, Paul Fromm and others in the far right movement. 

The first human rights complaint was made by the Canadian Jewish Congress, but failed. The second by Harry Abrams, a Director of CAERS and a spokesperson for B’Nai Brith, succeeded; the newspaper was fined and forced to print an apology. As noted below, demonstrations against meetings in public libraries and public space finally resulted in policies to stop racist meetings. 

 Radio station AM 1040– Vancouver 1995

Radio station AM 1040 began to broadcast a series of interviews in 1995 with British Holocaust denier David Irving, Doug Collins, a reporter with the North Shore News and Charles Scott the leader of Aryan Nations in Canada. CAERS gave interviews to several newspapers complaining that the radio station was providing a forum for racists. 

Radio station AM 1040 retaliated by suing CAERS and Alan Dutton for defamation. The Georgia Straight and the Western Jewish Bulletin covered Dutton’s charges but only the Western Jewish Tribune was included in the lawsuit. 

The radio station dropped the lawsuit with costs after a short discovery when it became clear that the lawsuit would not succeed and that there would be negative publicity for the radio station.

 Canadian Human Rights Commission – 1995

Following the radio station defamation suit, several complaints were made to the Canadian Human Rights Commission (CHRC) concerning, www.recomnetwork.org, a CAERS' run website that provided information on racism and hate groups. The complainants, Alexan Kulbashian and Andrew Guille, claimed that posting complaints made by Richard Warman to the CHRC against several hate groups and hate group members, allowing live links to websites that were named in Warman’s complaints, and the presence of several racist statements made by a reader as a comment on news stories was discriminatory, contrary to Section 13(1) of the Canadian Human Rights Act. Rush, Crane and Guenther successfully argued on behalf of CAERS that both complaints were made in bad faith since Kulbashian had earlier been found to have contravened the CHR Act for his website, Canadian Ethnic Cleansing Team, as had Guille's sister, Melissa Guille for the Canadian Heritage Alliance, that Warman’s complaints were public knowledge, that the active links complained about were inadvertent and had been de-activated, that the racist postings were not condoned and that filters had been implemented to prevent racist postings as comments on news stories. Racist groups continue to argue that CAERS received preferential treatment from the CHRC.

 Fairview Technology Centre - Oliver BC 1996

Bernard Klattis a former Canadian internet service provider based in the tiny city of Oliver BC who ran what Sol Littman of the Simon Wiesenthall Center called "Canada's most notorious source of hate propaganda.” Klatt’s Fairview Technology Centrehosted websites for at least 12 groups promoting white supremacy and hate against minorities, including Combat 18, Heritage Front, British National Front, KKK, Euro-Canadian Defense League, Canadian Patriot's Network - hosted at the Freedom Site run by Marc Lemire, as well as Skin-Net, White Power Skinheads, Berserk, New Order and Nordland. After negative national and local media the cable TV company cut off Klatt’s cable access and ordered Klatt to get his server computer out of its offices. In 1998, Klatt organized a meeting in Oliver, coinciding with the United Nations International Day for the Elimination of Racism, featuring Doug Collins, Doug Christie, Eileen Pressler and Paul Fromm. The young head of Odin’s Law attended from Surrey. 60-75 demonstrators picketed the meeting and a conference on right wing extremism and the Internet was held with the Mayor of Oliver as a key speaker in New Westminster, BC.

 Tynehead Hall –Surrey 1997

Several hundred people rallied against hate at a remote rural setting to protest the use of public facilities by racist heavy metal bands. Racist skinheads came from California, Oregon, Alberta and BC. The event required a large Surrey RCMP contingent and was widely covered by the media. The Tynehead Hall was never used again for racist concerts.

(Odin’s Law – etc) 

 ADT Securities - North Vancouver 1997

Brian Taylor distributed KKK – Sons of Freedom – Knights of the Ku Klux Klans, Pacific Realm - pamphlets and flyers complaining about First Nations land claims saying that “When will we get some politicians with some backbone who won’t start shaking in their boots every time [sic] the Indians threaten to disrupt the established order?” 

Taylor was exposed on August 10, 1997 by CAERS when he mailed a Klan membership using ADT Securities mailing services. Taylor’s family were obviously concerned and he decided then that he was going to leave the hate group. Previously, Taylor had installed home security in a home of a Liberal Party of Canada strategist and author of a study of RWE. CAERS facilitated interviews with TV reporters with the BC Hate Crime Team in attendance.

 Racist Skinheads – Surrey 1998 

Over 2,000 people marched through Surrey, BC to commemorate the life of Nirmal Singh Gill, a caretaker at the Guru Nanak Temple kicked to death by five racists. Evidence against the five included tape-recorded plans to kill hundreds of young Sikhs in Surrey. One of the men found guilty was Nathan Leblanc who was a former member of the Canadian Armed Forces stationed at Petawawa. Organizers of the March and rally went ahead with the rally despite publicized threats by organized hate groups of violence. The organizing committee included local Indo-Canadian organizations, including CAERS and several Vancouver based anti-racist organizations. Surrey RCMP officers and union members provided security. The huge demonstration drew intensive media attention to the problem of hate groups and helped mobilize the community. A family member of one of the accused approached an anti-racist organizer for CAERS in court to apologize and to ask for help.

 Vancouver & Victoria Public Libraries 1998

Neo-Nazi and other extremist groups have historically used public facilities for meetings because of their low cost and because they lend credibility to their cause. In response to the use of publicly funded facilitates by hate groups, CAERS began lobbying all levels of government and holding demonstrations to stop right wing extremist groups from using libraries. In response, the BC Library Association argued that libraries were independent of government control and that freedom of speech had no limits when libraries were concerned. The controversy about the responsible use of tax-payer supported institutions versus free speech generated a great deal of debate and a number of important motions by various city councils to develop acceptable use policy for publicly funded institutions. A complaint to the Ombudsman of BC resulted in the recommendation that libraries in BC issue a written statement of acceptable use regarding meeting room rental much like the acceptable use policy governing computer use and sexually explicit images and that persons using libraries comply with all federal, provincial and municipal legislation and regulations. The Library board chair called the Ombudsman’s recommendations ludicrous. To flout human rights even more, the BC Library Association awarded the Library an "intellectual award" for allowing hate groups to use library space.

While many libraries and public institutionsacross Canada abide by Canada's international and domestic responsibilities to prevent incitement and hatred by refusing to rent or provide space to organizations likely to expose patrons to hate, the Vancouver Public Library, the Juan de Fuca Library, the Collingwood Library and the Saanich Public Library sided with racists and allowed hate groups to use library space for meetings. In fact, the Victoria Public Library rented a meeting room for use by Paul Fromm, Doug Christie and Ernst Zundel. Doug Christie was described by the Law Society of B.C. in 1993 as a person who "has made common cause with a small lunatic anti-Semitic fringe element of our society." Paul Fromm, a former schoolteacher, was fired in 1996 for his involvement with hate groups. Ernst Zundel is a holocaust denier, deported from Canada as a security threat and sent to Germany to serve time for incitement. 

On June 5 1999, the Victoria Public Library Branch in Saanich provided space for a meeting of the Canadian Free Speech League to sponsor with NorthShore News reporter, Doug Collins. Collins was found to have promoted hatred by the BC Human Rights Commission in a newspaper column written for the North Shore News. This resulted in demonstrations with over 400 at the Juan de Fuca Library and 4-500 at the main Vancouver Public Library to protest library policy allowing racists to use public faculties to raise money, gain credibility and recruit members.With growing outrage about racist meetings in public facilities, BC library policy was finally forced into civilized society.

 Matsqui Institution - Matsqui 1998

In October 1998 Ku Klux Klan symbols were found at Correction Services Canada, Matsqui Institution. The media carried extensive news coverage about the incident and Institution “went into crisis.” The Canadian Anti-racism Education and Research Society was asked to help facilitate institutional change and help the institution change and help the Institution respond more effectively to hate group activity. This was the first time an anti-racism program had been undertaken in Canada. According to the Institution “The anti-racism program has helped deal directly, forcefully and effectively with a real and present crisis involving prison staff and minority inmates… This is a unique project in Canada and will serve as a model for other institutions facing similar crises.” The project resulted in a book of symbols of hate groups and the project was nominated and won an End Racism Award from the government of the province of BC. 

 Exterminance - Prince George 2008

Keith Francis William Noble was convicted in 2008 of disseminating hate propaganda contrary to the Criminal Code of Canadaandwas prohibited from accessing the Internet. However, CAERS provided evidence to the Attorney General of BC that Noble was apparently in violation of the terms and conditions of his parole and demanded enforcement. Since Noble has relocated to Alberta, CAERS also wrote to the Attorney General of Alberta, where Mr. Noble was then residing, to investigate Mr. Noble's alleged online activity and prosecute Mr. Noble for violation of the conditions of his parole. No action was apparently taken.

 Blood and Honour - Vancouver 2011

Several members of Blood and Honour were arrested and charged with assaults on the eastside of Vancouver. Blood and Honour is an international neo-Nazi hate crime group that has become active and violent in BC. It started in England in the 1970’s, but is now active in Calgary, Ontario, and BC. The group of about 20 hard-core members in BC appear to be between 20 and 40 years old - and recruit using Nazi metal music, mixed martial arts and racially motivated violence. BC’s hate crime team has laid six assault charges against threesuspected members accused of racially motivated assaults.  Two are accused of setting a Filipino man on fire as he napped on a discarded sofa. Alistair Miller, aged 20 and 25 year old Robert de Chazal were charged. Shawn Donald Finlay Macdonald is the suspected leader of one faction of Blood and Honour in BC and he faces two charges for assaulting a Latino man and an aboriginal woman in 2010. 

 Nazi emails- Vancouver 2012

The names of dozens of alleged white supremacists in Canada were provided to the CBC through a hack of Nazi emails. In addition to emails and secret websites and blogs, were photographs, confidential legal documents and displays of Hitler tattoos. The exposure of the private files was a huge blow to hate groups that organize online across Canada, said Helmut-Harry Loewen, a University of Winnipeg sociology professor and a member of the Canadian Anti-racism Education and Research Society. "We can now begin to piece together a more accurate picture in terms of the distribution of these types of racist groups across Canada," Loewen said. Anti-racist groups hope the exposure further hampers online recruitment by white supremacist organizations. 

 Soldiers of Odin- Vancouver, Kelowna and Kamloops 2016

Soldiers of Odinwas founded in Finland in late 2015 by Mika Ranta, who is a white long-time white supremacist activist. Members of the group in Finland are allegedly responsible for the murder of a young anti-racist activist. This year the group has exploded, in Europe and internationally. The Anti Defamation League describes as an “anti-refugee vigilante group”. The central idea of the Soldiers is based on an alleged association between Muslims – both refugees and immigrants – and crime. The Soldiers offer protection and is pitched at white fears about Arabs and other migrant groups.  In this context, one thing that sets them apart from other groups is their street patrols. The Soldiers now have chapters in Vancouver, Kelowna and Kamloops where several marches have been organized.

Arthur Topham – Quesnel 2017

Topham runs an anti-Semitic website and in 2015 was found guilty under criminal code provisions of spreading hate. Topham argued that the criminal code provisions were a violation of the constitution but on February 20, 2017 his constitutional challenge was rejected. Topham will be sentenced on March 10, 2017. (More)

 KKK flyers - Hope, Abbotsford, Richmond, New West Minster, Vancouver2017

KKK flyers were distributed over several months in Hope, Abbotsford, Richmond, New West Minster. Police are investigating but no charges have been laid. Demonstrations were held in Richmond and New Westminster. One white male from Hope was recorded uttering racist remarks and threats in Abbotsford. He was charged with causing a disturbance but not a hate crime. A Latino male was also accosted in Vancouver by a white male who made threats and uttered racist remarks. No charges were laid by the Vancouver Police Department

Selected Leaders

· John Ball ran for election on the slate of the governing province of BC Social Credit Party but was forced to withdraw when news of his association with Ernst Zundel, Paul Fromm and Doug Christie was publicized. Ball’s name was found among the acknowledgements in a revisionist book titled “The Great Holocaust Trial,” and was credited with “playing an important role” at Zundel’s trial for disseminating revisionist history. This turned into a scandal when Social Credit Premier Rita Johnston acknowledged that she knew of Ball’s connections but did nothing until the connections appeared in the media. Johnston tried to downplay the problem, but then accepted Ball’s resignation. Little has subsequently been heard of Ball.

Jud Cyllorn was an advisor to former Premier Bill Van der Zalm of the BC Social Credit Party and founded the Procult Institute in Vancouver. The Institute had an office in the tourist area of a prestigious part of old Vancouver and Cyllorn wrote the racist “Stop Apologizing.” Cyllorn had copies of the professionally published book sent to all MLAs in BC to disseminate his RWE views. Anti-racist held numerous demonstrations at the office with police in attendance to break up crowds. The office was finally closed after many demonstrations and confrontations and Cyllorn drifted out of public view as a leader and spokesperson in the far right. But attempts to infiltrate mainstream political parties have always been a strategy of the far right as documented by intelligence agencies, including the Reform Party of Canada and the later Conservative Party of Canada.

  • Doug Christie– Christie founded the Canadian Free Speech League (CFSL and helped organize a 1992 speaking tour for noted anti-Semite David Irving. Christie also awarded Paul Fromm their “George Orwell Free Speech Award” in 1995. Colleague and fellow lawyer, Gary Botting, publicly withdrew his support of Christie and the CFSL in 1996 in a very public news conference hosted by CAERS and the Victoria Jewish community. Botting described the CFSL as “…authoritarian and not the least open to free speech… in the CFSL, the only opinions are those which conform to your [Christie] own. And those opinions, as you well know are anti-Semitic and almost blatantly pro-Nazi.” The disciplinary committee of the Law Society of Upper Canada stated in 1993 that the Christie’s behaviour "crossed the line separating counsel from client: he has made common cause with a small, lunatic anti-Semitic fringe element in our society…."
  • Doug Collins– 1980s and 1990s. Collins wrote for the North Shore News and spoke at many events organized by Doug Christie, Paul Fromm and Ernst Zundel about immigration, the holocaust and Jewish control over the media. Collins was charged with the NorthSHore News under the BC Human Rights Act and was forced to issue an apology for his racist remarks.

· Bernard Klatt. Klattis a former Canadian internet service provider based in the tiny city of Oliver BC who ran what by Sol Littman of the Simon Wiesenthall Center called "Canada's most notorious source of hate propaganda". Klatt hosted websites for "at least 12 groups promoting white supremacy and hate against minorities, " including Combat 18, Heritage Front, British National Front, KKK, Euro-Canadian Defense League, Canadian Patriot's Network - hosted at the Freedom Site run by Marc Lemire, as well as Skin-Net, White Power Skinheads, Berserk, New Order and Nordland. After negative national and local media the cable TV company cut off Klatt’s cable access and ordered Klatt to get his server computer out of its offices. In 1998, Klatt organized a meeting in the Oliver, coinciding with the United Nations International Day for the Elimination, featuring Doug Collins, Doug Christie, Eileen Pressler and Paul Fromm. The young head of Odin’s Law attended from Surrey along with 60-75 demonstrators who picketed the meeting in the small town.

  • Tony McAleer McAleer was born in England and immigrated to Canada, attending U. Victoria in the late 1980s. Scott helped form the Aryan Resistance Movement (ARM) in the late 1980s and Canadian Liberty Net (CLN) shortly after. McAleer attended an Aryan Nations event in mid-April 1989 and was charged with assault along with Barry Wray and Al Hooper during ARM leafleting in Vancouver in Feb 1990. McAleer was sentenced in federal court August 1992 to two months in jail and fined $2,500. McAleer also attended an Aryan Fest in Provost, AB in August 1990. McAleer ran the CLN telephone line from his home in Vancouver under the name Derek J. Peterson. CLN was moved to Bellingham, WA when it was shut down in May 1992 because of a human rights complaint. McAleer was fined and CLN was also fined. CLN was shut down permanently soon after. Doug Christie defended McAleer in court in both 1992 and 1994. An LA talk radio station that planned to broadcast their tour to Auschwitz flew McAleer to Germany with John Metzger. Both McAleer and Metzger were arrested in Frankfurt and deported. Both were barred from entering Germany in the future. McAleer worked in Vancouver as an exterminator until he was recognized for his racist activities. It is reported that the Council on Public Affairs based in Salmon Arm BC helped pay his legal bills. McAleer has since said that he has renounced racism and speaks to groups through his society about racism as solely the responsibility of the individual.
  • Eilleen Pressler- Pressler founded the right-wing Council on Public Affairs (CPA) in Salmon Arm – a small town in central BC. Pressler published a newsletter and held meetings and hosted Eustace Mullins, a US resident, far right advocate and author, Ron Gostickof the Canadian League of Rights, and Pat Burnsa right wing broadcaster. It was rumored that the CPA paid Doug Christie’s legal fees in the defense of Tony McAleer.
  • Charles Scott Scott was originally from Edmonton where he claimed to have two martial arts schools. When in Vancouver, Scott was filmed by CBC TV teaching armed self-defence to members of the Canadian Armed forces medical core at Jericho, Vancouver. Scott’s activities included leafleting, operating a hate message telephone line and creating an Aryan Nations Youth group. Scott and Edgar Foth and Mattt Harrison received a mail-bomb while in Chilliwack and reported it to the RCMP. Scott moved several times but received more bomb threats and his house was vandalized. Scott became the Canadian director of Posse Comitatus after Terry Long declared he was stepping down. Scott was awarded Aryan of the Year by Richard Butler in 1995 after being ordained as a pastor at Hayden Lake. First interviewed by CAERS at Hayden Lake summer 1995, Scott provided a detailed account of his beliefs and organizing work. Scott later moved from Chilliwack to Kelowna and then to Yahk - a small town near Creston, BC all the while leading Aryan Nations. Scott started a hate line called the Canadian Patriot’s Network in 1995 in Toronto, Ont., reportedly with Marc Lemire. Scott’s wife reported that Charles was no longer a racist in 2002. Scott was in the news circa 2010 following an injury teaching armed self-defence to racists in Surrey. Scott emailed CAERS in 2011 to declare he was no longer a racist and to complain he was still being portrayed as a racist. 
  • Dan Sims– Sims was a high profile recruiter for Final Solution Skins, ARM, KKK, Aryan Nations, WAR Viking Youth, National Socialist Action Party, an honourary member of Scottish Storm Trooper Skins, S.S. Action Detroit, English National Front, etc. Sims served 60 days in Canadian Corrections for an assault in Edmonton, AB on retired newspaper reporter Keith Rutherford. He was interviewed in the Pierce County Detention Center in WA by CAERS where he spoke about his experience recruiting youth for hate groups in Canada and throughout the eastern and southeastern USA. Sims spoke about his disillusionment with violence and racism and using mainstream political parties to effect social change. Sims reports that he was encouraged to join RWE groups by his father who was an RCAF veteran. Edgar Foth reportedly groomed Sims as a protégé of Terry Long. Foth was a low profile associate of Charles Scott in Chilliwack. 
  • Bryan Taylor –Taylor was the head of the Sons of Freedom – Knights of the Ku Klux Klans, Pacific Realm and worked installing home security for ADT Securities in North Vancouver. He distributed KKK pamphlets and flyers complaining about First Nations land claims saying that “When will we get some policies with some backbone who won’t start shaking in their boots every time [sic] the Indians threaten to disrupt the established order?” Taylor was exposed on August 10, 1997 by CAERS when he mailed a Klan membership using ADT Securities mailing services. Taylor’s family were obviously concerned and he decided then that he was going to leave the hate group. It was learned later that Taylor had installed security in a home of a Liberal Party of Canada strategist and author of a study of RWE. CAERS facilitated interviews with TV reporters with the BC Hate Crime Team in attendance.

· Bill Noble - Keith Francis William Noble was convicted in 2008 of disseminating hate propaganda contrary to the Criminal Code of Canada.  Mr. Justice Glen Parrett rendered the following decision with respect to Mr. Noble's conviction for spreading hate: [11] Over the term of the probation order, there will be a prohibition on the accused's [Noble] accessing the Internet, a further prohibition from him having Internet service to his residence, and from being in attendance at any establishment whose primary business is the provision of Internet access to the public. [12] There will be a prohibition on possessing any modem or other device that would enable him [Noble] to access the Internet, and there will be a condition permitting police officers or probation officers to allow them to obtain personal subscriber information from any Internet service provider for the purpose of enforcing that prohibition. CAERS complained to the Attorney General of BC that Noble appeared to be in violation of the terms and conditions of his parole and demanded that the Attorney General, where Mr. Noble was prosecuted and convicted investigate. As Noble has relocated to Alberta, CAERS then wrote to the Attorney General of Alberta, where Mr. Noble was then residing, to investigate Mr. Noble's alleged online activity and prosecute Mr. Noble for violation of the conditions of his parole, if warranted. CAERS wrote that if Mr. Noble “is not held to account, the Canadian Anti-racism Education and Research Society fears that it will send a clear message that legal prohibitions against hate propaganda have no weight in Canada and that hate crime will inevitably increase.” The evidence that Mr. Noble appears to be in direct violation of the decision rendered by Mr. Justice Glen Parrett includes the following. Mr. Noble used, and appears to be still using, the online alias "Exterminance". The Exterminance alias can be found on Youtube at http://www.youtube.com/Exterminance. Mr. Noble's recent comments on YouTube can be found at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cYX7Ft0Vonkand his login times can be seen at http://www.youtube.com/Exterminance. Some of Mr. Noble's online "friends" accepted on his Youtube account include members of the notorious racist British National Party. Mr. Noble's presence on the racist online discussion group, Stormfront, is also evident. Mr. Noble is not timid about his disdain for the terms of his probation and claims that the conviction has no bearing or weight. Complaints about the continued use of the Internet despite the conditions of Mr. Noble's conditions of parole and Mr. Noble's continuation of involvement in hate groups have been sent to the British Columbia hate crime team and the special Crown Council for hate crime where Mr. Noble was convicted and paroled. According to Alan Dutton, Executive Director of the Canadian Anti-racism Education and Research Society, "this situation is intolerable. How can a convicted hate monger continue to disregard the terms of his probation by moving from one province to another? The lack of enforcement action calls into question the worth of Canadian hate crime laws and the administration of justice." Dutton points out that provincial and federal governments have promised to take hate crime seriously, but have obviously allowed a person like Mr. Noble to fall between the cracks of provincial jurisdiction.

  • Arthur Topham– Topham runs an anti-Semitic website and in 2015 was found guilty under criminal code provisions of spreading hate. Topham argued that the criminal code provisions were a violation of the constitution but on February 20, 2017 his constitutional challenge was rejected. Topham will be sentenced on March 10, 2017. 

 

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