UK

Facebook bans UK far right groups and leaders

Facebook has imposed a ban on a dozen far-right individuals and organisations that it says "spread hate".

The ban includes the British National Party and Nick Griffin, the English Defence League and the National Front. 

The list also includes Britain First, which was already banned, but this latest action will prohibit support for it on any of the US firm's services.

It said it had taken the action because those involved had proclaimed a "violent or hateful mission".

Ukip’s transformation into a far-right party is complete

Remember the UK Independence party? That cheery Eurosceptic rabble led by Nigel Farage? Ever since the UK opted for Brexit, the party collapsed in on itself— consumed by self-loathing in a desperate search for purpose. While its most notable leader went off to become a transatlantic media pundit, Ukip went through a succession of abysmal leaders who have struggled to make headway. But under MEP Gerard Batten, it has quietly transformed into something deeply nasty.

Who Needs Tommy Robinson and the EDL, When Islamophobia Has Gone Mainstream?

It was the most stunning volte-face since Libya's foreign minister Mousa Kousa defected to the west in 2011. Or perhaps since Sol Campbell left Spurs for Arsenal on a free transfer in 2001. On 8 October, Tommy Robinson (aka Stephen Yaxley-Lennon, aka Andrew Mc- Master, aka Paul Harris), the co-founder and leader of the English Defence League (EDL), quit the far-right group and joined hands with the Quilliam Foundation, a 'counter-extremism' think tank.

Founders of anti-Muslim English Defence League quit group citing ‘dangers of far-right extremism

LONDON Two leaders of a far-right, anti-Muslim group in Britain announced Tuesday that growing extremism in the organizations ranks has led them to quit a decision helped by a group founded by former Islamist radicals.

Tommy Robinson and Kevin Carroll said they were leaving the small but high-profile English Defence League, the group they founded in 2009.

The Quilliam Foundation, an anti-extremism think-tank founded by former Muslim jihadists, said it had helped facilitate the pairs departure.

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Analysis: Under the skin of Britain's neo-nationalists

In the aftermath of the English Defence League (EDL) rally in Manchester last Saturday, it is worth taking stock of how such an organisation has gained support, what it truly stands for and how it should be perceived within the spectrum of Europe’s far right. It should not simply be dismissed as a racist or fascist BNP front.

Managers and skilled workers make up bulk of far right supporters

The study found the image of young unemployed people alienated by tough economic times and turning to the anti-Muslim and anti-immigration group was a myth. In fact half of sympathizers are in full time work, almost one in five is university educated and more than two thirds own their own home. The report, by the think tank Chatham House, warns ministers and those combating extremism need to reassess who they target.

Tories warn Cameron that gay marriage will split party

David Cameron has been warned that he could tear the Conservative Party in two if he goes ahead with legislation that will permit churches to hold marriage ceremonies for gay people. The Government is due to make an announcement this week that will give more detail of precisely what it is proposing, against a rising tide of outrage on the Tory back benches that the Prime Minister has been won over by supporters of gay marriage.

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