social media

Far-right groups on terror list will rebrand: expert

Far-right groups on terror list will rebrand: expert

ZAK VESCERA

Adding Neo-Nazis to the country's list of terrorist groups was a "symbolic" gesture, says expert Candyce Kelshall. CALGARY POLICE SERVICE/Files

The federal government is unpre­pared for tackling far-right ex­tremism and needs to rethink its approach, said a local think-tank. 

Starving online trolls won’t stop far-right ideas from going mainstream

Facebook recently announced it is banning a number of Canadian far-right figures and groups from its platform. Those expelled from Facebook include the “alt-right” activist Faith Goldy and the hate groups Soldiers of Odin, the Canadian Nationalist Front, and the Aryan Strikeforce.

The decision comes on the heels of the terrorist attacks in Christchurch, New Zealand, where a white supremacist killed 50 worshippers and injured 50 more at two mosques in the city.

Facebook bans UK far right groups and leaders

Facebook has imposed a ban on a dozen far-right individuals and organisations that it says "spread hate".

The ban includes the British National Party and Nick Griffin, the English Defence League and the National Front. 

The list also includes Britain First, which was already banned, but this latest action will prohibit support for it on any of the US firm's services.

It said it had taken the action because those involved had proclaimed a "violent or hateful mission".

Starving online trolls won’t stop far-right ideas from going mainstream

Facebook recently announced it’s banning a number of Canadian far-right figures and groups from its platform. Those expelled from Facebook include the “alt-right” activist Faith Goldy and the hate groups Soldiers of Odin, the Canadian Nationalist Front and the Aryan Strikeforce.

Facebook bans do not equate to restrictions on free speech

"There seems to be a fundamental misunderstanding in some circles of what freedom of speech is actually about. Goldy and her friends are not being silenced, but some of their venues are rejecting them. It’s not particularly different from someone being allowed to speak their mind outside of one’s home, but not be invited into the kitchen to hold forth."

Twitter bans white-nationalist group Canadian Nationalist Front

Twitter suspended accounts associated with the white-nationalist group Canadian Nationalist Front on Tuesday, a day after Facebook banned that group as well as others it said promoted “organized hate” from its platform. The move comes as lawmakers in Canada and abroad debate imposing new rules on social-media companies in the wake of deadly shootings at two mosques in New Zealand.

On Tuesday, Twitter declined to comment but confirmed that multiple accounts affiliated with the group were permanently suspended under its Violent Extremist Group policy.

Facebook bans Faith Goldy and 'dangerous' alt-right groups

Social media giant says platform can't be used to spread hate

Faith Goldy, who was supposed to speak at Wilfrid Laurier University but was interrupted by a fire alarm, speaks outside the university on Tuesday, March 20, 2018. Goldy has been banned from Facebook as part of the social media platform's rules on dangerous individuals and groups. (Hannah Yoon/The Canadian Press)

Countering hate speech on social media

Social media has proven itself to be the greatest bastion of free speech on the Internet. Governments have usually refrained to interfere in this domain and until now the arena is marked with a great sense of openness. People express their political and social views publicly and in a rather frank manner. But this fondness for freedom of expression has lead to emergence of a disturbing trend over the years as the line between freedom of speech and hate speech has become blurred.

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African states urged to ratify Budapest Cybercrime Convention

The Council of Europe (CoE) not to be confused with the more powerful European Union (EU) is leading the rest of the world in a push to have more countries ratify the Convention on Cybercrime. CoE's former Directorate General of Human Rights and Legal affairs, Head of Economic Crime Division, Alexander Seger, was recently in Nairobi for the sixth Internet Governance Forum (IGF). Seger now heads CoE's new cybercrime division as the organisation reorganised itself to put more structure on cybercrime.

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