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Whatcott flyers were hate speech, Supreme Court rules

To many, the Supreme Court of Canada's decision in the case of the Saskatchewan Human Rights Commission vs. William Whatcott was a triumph for the rights of vulnerable groups to be protected from the harm caused by extreme expressions of hate and discrimination.

To others, it was a triumph of censorship and a blow against the democratic principles of freedom of expression and religion.

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Bill C-304: Hate Speech Clause's Repeal Gives White Supremacists Rare Moment Of Glee

A Conservative private members’ bill that repeals part of Canada’s hate speech laws has passed the House of Commons with scant media attention, and even less commentary. But it's being cheered by many Canadian conservatives as a victory for freedom of speech. And it's being cheered most vocally by another group: White supremacists.

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The day Canada’s white supremacists saluted Stephen Harper

o far, Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s ideology-inspired of project of social and political engineering expresses itself most eloquently in three ways: the Conservatives’ egregious assault on civi

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Is criminal law the answer to hate propaganda? The Case of Terry Tremaine

Is criminal law the answer to hate propaganda?

The Case of Terry Tremaine

Human Rights Complaint

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Bill C-304: Hate Speech Clause's Repeal Gives White Supremacists Rare Moment Of Glee

A Conservative private members’ bill that repeals part of Canada’s hate speech laws has passed the House of Commons with scant media attention, and even less commentary. But it's being cheered by many Canadian conservatives as a victory for freedom of speech. And it's being cheered most vocally by another group: White supremacists.

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