First Nations

National inquiry calls murders and disappearances of Indigenous women a 'Canadian genocide'

The thousands of Indigenous women and girls who were murdered or disappeared across the country in recent decades are victims of a "Canadian genocide," says the final report of the national inquiry created to probe the ongoing tragedy.

The report, obtained by CBC News and verified by sources, concludes that a genocide driven by the disproportionate level of violence faced by Indigenous women and girls occurred in Canada through "state actions and inactions rooted in colonialism and colonial ideologies."

Sacred fire planned at human rights museum to highlight First Nations water issues

A group of First Nations people plans to light a sacred fire near the Canadian Museum for Human Rights in Winnipeg to educate visitors about how many indigenous communities don't have access to clean drinking water.

Daryl Redsky, left, of Shoal Lake #40 First Nation, is part of a group that is raising awareness of water issues in indigenous communities. It plans to light a sacred fire near the Canadian Museum for Human Rights in time for its grand opening this weekend. (CBC)

The ideological roots of Stephen Harper’s vendetta against sociology

Stephen Harper really seems to have it out for sociology. In 2013, in response to an alleged plot against a VIA train, Harper remarked that we should not “commit sociology,” but pursue an anti-crime approach. And last week, in response to the death of Tina Fontaine, Harper argued that an inquiry into missing and murdered indigenous women is not needed, because this is not a “sociological phenomenon” but simply a series of individual crimes.

Person of interest: 

Harper Solicits Research to Blame First Nations for Murdered, Missing and Traded Indigenous Women

Canada’s shameful colonial history as it relates to Indigenous peoples and women specifically is not well known by the public at large. The most horrific of Canada’s abuses against Indigenous peoples are not taught in schools. Even public discussion around issues like genocide have been censored by successive federal governments, and most notably by Harper’s Conservatives. Recently, the new Canadian Museum for Human Rights refused to use the term “genocide” to describe Canada’s laws, policies and actions towards Indigenous peoples which led to millions of deaths.

Stupidity outbreak mars Harper’s visit

What a relief. Prime Minister Stephen Harper visited Whitehorse yesterday and shared with the territory a fresh insight: the plight of missing and murdered aboriginal women in Canada is not, in fact, a “sociological phenomenon.” Rather, the root of the problem is that we simply haven’t locked enough people away in prison.

“We should view it as crime,” Harper said. “It is crime against innocent people, and it needs to be addressed as such.”

Well, that makes things much tidier, doesn’t it?

Person of interest: 

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