Cybercrime

Where America's Racist Tweets Come From

The day after Barack Obama won a second term as president of the United States, the blog Jezebel published a slideshow. The gallery displayed a collection of screen-capped tweets. Among them was this:

There were, both shockingly and unsurprisingly, many more where that came from. And many of those tweets were geocoded: Embedded in them were data about where in the U.S. they were sent from.

Top court weighs free speech vs. hate protection (Canada)

The country's highest court heard arguments pitting freedom of expression against laws banning hate speech Wednesday, setting the stage for an eventual ruling on what is more in need of protection: groups targeted with hatred, or a citizen's right to speak freely.

It could take the Supreme Court months to decide on which side they fall in the case of the Saskatchewan Human Rights Commission versus William Whatcott.

Person of interest: 

African states urged to ratify Budapest Cybercrime Convention

The Council of Europe (CoE) not to be confused with the more powerful European Union (EU) is leading the rest of the world in a push to have more countries ratify the Convention on Cybercrime. CoE's former Directorate General of Human Rights and Legal affairs, Head of Economic Crime Division, Alexander Seger, was recently in Nairobi for the sixth Internet Governance Forum (IGF). Seger now heads CoE's new cybercrime division as the organisation reorganised itself to put more structure on cybercrime.

DIGITAL HATE: REPORT SHOWS BIGOTS' INFLUENCE ON INTERNET

21/3/2011- Bigots have ramped up sharply on Facebook, YouTube and other social media, with very anti-social aims -- including racism, anti-Semitism, homophobia and Islamophobia -- according to a new report on the topic. "They come for all the reasons everyone else does," Rabbi Abraham Cooper, associate dean of the Simon Wiesenthal Center, said during a recent visit to South Florida. "For bigots, it's a way to reach the mainstream with its message." Cooper was sharing the results of "Digital Hate," an annual report issued by the Los Angeles-based center.

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