Bill C-51

Anti-terror Bill C-51 and [Missing Aboriginal Women] raises eyebrows at UN

OTTAWA -- The United Nations Human Rights Committee is raising concerns about Canada's new anti-terror legislation, saying it could run afoul of the international covenant on civil and political rights.

The committee says it's concerned sweeping powers in the law, known as C-51, do not contain enough legal safeguards to protect people's rights.

The committee says while it appreciates Canada must take steps to protect against terrorism, the government should consider rewriting the law to ensure it complies with the international civil rights agreement.

Undercover police and policing On the blacklist: how did the UK’s top building firms get secret information on their workers?

Five years after a blacklist was found that singled out construction site workers for being union activists, the full extent of undercover police surveillance and collusion is still not known, and myriad questions remain

BILL C-51 BACKGROUNDER #5: OVERSIGHT AND REVIEW: TURNING ACCOUNTABILITY GAPS INTO CANYONS?

Canada’s system of national security “oversight” is imperfect. Its system of national security “review” is frayed, perhaps to the breaking point. The government’s antiterrorism law, bill C-51, will accelerate this pattern. Without a serious course correction, we risk the prospect of avertible security service scandals.

There is often a misunderstanding about the distinction between “oversight” and “review”.

Person of interest: