Anders Behring Breivik

Sending out a Political Signal

In the wake of 9/11, a new brand of home-grown right-wing terrorism was able to emerge in Germany. Even specially drafted anti-terror laws didn't help because right-wing radicalism had been underestimated and sometimes even structurally repressed for too long. After the brutal right-wing extremist terrorist attacks in Norway, it became clear in Germany too that right-wing terrorists were capable of carrying out the worst attacks the country had seen since the Second World War.

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What Canada can learn from the Wisconsin Sikh temple shooting

Canadians disturbed by white supremacist Wade Michael Page's shooting rampage at a Wisconsin Sikh temple that killed seven people on August 5 should be worried about what could happen in Canada, says an anti-racism expert who has tracked white supremacist groups in Canada for over twenty years.

Alan Dutton, co-founder of the Canadian Anti-racism Education and Research Society (CAERS) and and member of the Stop Racism and Hate Collective, said that Canadians ought to be more aware of the state of hate crime monitoring in their own backyard.

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Trial of 'the madman' Breivik ignores a virulent ideology

The trial of the right-wing terrorist Anders Behring Breivik has been a field day in the international media, with Breivik's ice-cold bearing and callous statements playing to the headlines. For many of the journalists inside the courtroom, however, the first couple of days in Oslo were disappointing in terms of actual information.

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Norway's atrocity: a story of non-impact

The immediate reactions to the terrorist attack in Oslo in July 2011 were both politicised and inaccurate. The opening of the perpetrator's trial nine months later finds leading ideological positions still full of evasion, says Cas Mudde.

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COULD BRITAIN'S FAR-RIGHT PRODUCE AN ANDERS BEHRING BREIVIK?

As the number of terror offences committed in Britain has dropped dramatically since the London Tube bombings in 2005, the country faces a new peril in far-right extremism, a group of MPs says. The home affairs select committee published its report, Roots of Violent Radicalisation, after looking into why people turn to terrorism and what can be done about it.

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